Sit and Dream
kye-leng:

pornosophical:

jzanity1010:

dbvictoria:

More Disney Parks facts here

TREASURED GUEST

But how could you leave out this

image

Average Lifespans in Mass Effect
Avoiding death by disease, combat, Shepard...
Vorcha: 20 years
Salarians: 40 years
Batarian: 80 years
Drell: 85 years
Volus: 85 years
Humans: 150 years
Turian: 150 years
Elcor: 500 years
Asari: 1,000 years
Krogan: 1,000+ years
Jenkins: 12 minutes
did-you-kno:

Scientists have found a way to “switch off” autoimmune diseases by converting cells that attack healthy tissue into cells that protect against disease. This incredible breakthrough has the potential to save the lives of millions of people. Source

did-you-kno:

Scientists have found a way to “switch off” autoimmune diseases by converting cells that attack healthy tissue into cells that protect against disease. This incredible breakthrough has the potential to save the lives of millions of people. Source

kinomatika:

i wanted to draw wonder woman so i did

kinomatika:

i wanted to draw wonder woman so i did

indecentinkling2:

That’s not how you do it Javik

muffpunch:

todd-johnson:

what even are cats

Everything about this picture is the greatest thing I’ve ever seen.

muffpunch:

todd-johnson:

what even are cats

Everything about this picture is the greatest thing I’ve ever seen.

laboratoryequipment:

We Evolved Unique Faces for a Purpose
The amazing variety of human faces – far greater than that of most other animals – is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study by UC Berkeley scientists.
Our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend, said behavioral ecologist Michael Sheehan, a postdoctoral fellow in UC Berkeley’s Museum of Vertebrate Zoology. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify individuals, making distinctive facial features unimportant, especially for animals that roam after dark, he said. But humans are different.
“Humans are phenomenally good at recognizing faces; there is a part of the brain specialized for that,” Sheehan said. “Our study now shows that humans have been selected to be unique and easily recognizable. It is clearly beneficial for me to recognize others, but also beneficial for me to be recognizable. Otherwise, we would all look more similar.”
“The idea that social interaction may have facilitated or led to selection for us to be individually recognizable implies that human social structure has driven the evolution of how we look,” said coauthor Michael Nachman, a population geneticist, professor of integrative biology and director of the UC Berkeley Museum of Vertebrate Zoology.
Continue reading…

laboratoryequipment:

We Evolved Unique Faces for a Purpose

The amazing variety of human faces – far greater than that of most other animals – is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study by UC Berkeley scientists.

Our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend, said behavioral ecologist Michael Sheehan, a postdoctoral fellow in UC Berkeley’s Museum of Vertebrate Zoology. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify individuals, making distinctive facial features unimportant, especially for animals that roam after dark, he said. But humans are different.

Humans are phenomenally good at recognizing faces; there is a part of the brain specialized for that, Sheehan said. Our study now shows that humans have been selected to be unique and easily recognizable. It is clearly beneficial for me to recognize others, but also beneficial for me to be recognizable. Otherwise, we would all look more similar.

The idea that social interaction may have facilitated or led to selection for us to be individually recognizable implies that human social structure has driven the evolution of how we look, said coauthor Michael Nachman, a population geneticist, professor of integrative biology and director of the UC Berkeley Museum of Vertebrate Zoology.

Continue reading…

Reblog if you’re one of the few people who actually like broccoli.

mocha199:

msprettypanties:

abbacuus:

yourequitelovely:

kindamindless:

get-motivation:

mamayoda:

 

askrawrandjett:

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Steamed broccoli is so amazing!

I LOVE BROCCOLI

FUCK YES. I could eat pounds of that shit.

Give me some ranch and I can live off that for years.

With lots of butter please!

Love it